Content Marketing

Sherlock Holmes Level Investigative Marketing – Marketer of the Month Podcast with Ross Simmonds

30 min read
Hey there! Welcome to the Marketer Of The Month blog!

We recently interviewed Ross Simmonds for our monthly podcast – ‘Marketer of the Month’! We had some amazing insightful conversations with Ross and here’s what we discussed about – 

1. Has content creation peaked out?

2. Tik Tok as an emerging marketing channel for B2B businesses 

3. The transition from CREAM to DREAM

4. His aim behind establishing Foundation

5. How his journey began in the field of content marketing

6. How marketers can ensure originality in their content marketing efforts

About our host:

Dr. Saksham Sharda is the Chief Information Officer at Outgrow.co He specializes in data collection, analysis, filtering, and transfer by the means of widgets and applets. Interactive, cultural, and trending widgets designed by him have been featured on TrendHunter, Alibaba, ProductHunt, New York Marketing Association, FactoryBerlin, Digimarcon Silicon Valley, and at The European Affiliate Summit.

About our guest:

Ross Simmonds is the founder of Foundation Markets. Ross has worked closely with Fortune 500 companies to up-and-coming startups. He’s been published in Forbes, Huffington Post, Business Insider, Venture Beat, BET, CBC, Social Media Examiner and more. He was named in Mashable as one of the top Snapchat marketers in the world, and he has shared his thoughts on marketing and tech around the globe at conferences and events, such as SearchLove, CTAConf, MozCon and more.

The Podcast –  Sherlock Holmes Level Investigative Marketing with Ross Simmonds

The Intro!

Saksham Sharda: Hi everyone. Welcome to another episode of Outgrow’s marketer of the month. I’m your host, Dr. Saksham Sharda. I’m the creative director at outgrow.co. And for this month, we are going to interview Ross Simmonds, who is the founder and CEO of Foundation Marketing. 

Thanks for joining us Ross.

Ross Simmonds : Thanks for having me doc! Looking forward to it. 

The Rapid Fire!

Saksham Sharda:  So we’re going to start with a rapid-fire round just to break the ice. You get three passes in case you don’t want to answer the question. You can just say pass, but try to keep your answers to one word or one sentence only. 

Ross Simmonds : Okay. Let’s do it.

Saksham Sharda: How long does it take you to get ready in the mornings? 

Ross Simmonds : 20 minutes. 

Saksham Sharda: The most embarrassing moment of your life?

Ross Simmonds : Ummm….

Saksham Sharda: We’re going to pass that one! 

Saksham Sharda: How many hours of sleep can you survive on? 

Ross Simmonds : Seven!

Saksham Sharda: Fill in the blank. An upcoming marketing trend is _________.

Ross Simmonds : TikTok 

Saksham Sharda: The city in which the best kiss of her life happened? 

Ross Simmonds : Halifax, Nova Scotia. 

Saksham Sharda: Pick one, Mark Zuckerberg or Jack Dorsey?

Ross Simmonds : Zuckerberg.

Saksham Sharda: The first one movie that comes to your mind when I say the word ‘ambition’? 

Ross Simmonds : American gangster. 

Saksham Sharda: When did you last cry and why?

Ross Simmonds : Eight years ago when my grandfather died. 

Saksham Sharda: Okay. The biggest mistake of your life?

Ross Simmonds : Sticking with my second job for way too long. 

Saksham Sharda: How do you relax? 

Ross Simmonds : Yoga.

Saksham Sharda: How many cups of coffee do you drink per day? 

Ross Simmonds : Two! 

Saksham Sharda: A habit of yours that you hate? 

Ross Simmonds : The avoidance of confrontation. 

Saksham Sharda: The most valuable skill you’ve learned in life?

Ross Simmonds : How to write. 

Saksham Sharda: And finally, your favorite Netflix show? 

Ross Simmonds : All things Marble! But that’s not on Netflix. 

Saksham Sharda: I accept that! Okay. Well, that’s the end of the rapid-fire round. You scored eight on 10 because of two passes and one time out! I think, or something like that. So you win a car, just kidding! You wouldn’t win a car!

I wish I could afford to just give out cars just like that, but anyways! All right, let’s go onto the first. Now we’re going to go into the bigger questions and feel free to answer them in as much length and depth as you like. 

The Big Questions!

Saksham Sharda: So the first one is – Content creators and marketers have seen a huge boost during and post COVID. Do you think it has peaked out already because of, you know, digital fatigue, a lot of people experiencing, or is that more we can expect from content creators? 

Ross Simmonds : I think there’s more that we can expect. The reason is because there’s never been a heightened degree of desire for content and information. And as long as people want information, there’s going to be a role for content creators to deliver it.

And as people’s attention is also being diverged away from things such as traditional TV and radio, it just opens up the whole decentralization of content and storytelling to be more niche, more tailored across a wide variety of subcategories and subcultures and thus the opportunity to create and deliver value has never been greater.

Saksham Sharda: And what is one thing that you are planning to do or that you’re already doing? Keeping a post COVID environment in mind? 

Ross Simmonds : Yeah, creating content across multiple planets forms is really one of the key priorities at this moment for myself and the clients we’re working with. It’s recognizing that a piece of content shouldn’t live and die on just one platform.

It should survive and thrive on other platforms as well. One YouTube video, one podcast, one blog post can ultimately become multiple assets in different channels. So recognizing that and embracing it is definitely a focus and an emphasis for. 

Saksham Sharda: And how about TikTok? You mentioned tick-tock as an emerging marketing trend. Now, are you doing something on TikTok? Do you have a strategy? Etc. etc.

Ross Simmonds : Yeah. So across all vertical video, TikTok including, I think there’s a massive shift in attention to that type of a channel and TikTok I would consider one of the early days of B2B opportunities. And it’s one that I have my eye on for early days in terms of looking at it as a channel that we can leverage and utilize for ourselves, but we’ve already seen some success and wins on the board for clients who are using it in unique ways, capitalizing on influencers, in their ability to connect with initiative. 

Saksham Sharda: So, could you give us one example of a B2B, a good marketing strategy that has actually booked on TikTok? 

Ross Simmonds : Yeah, so I think what we have recently started to do is find influencers who have a very niche audience.

And they’re speaking about something like marketing and then reaching out to those influencers, partnering with them and actually collaborating on the creation of new content for those brands. So you recognize, like you might not be fluent in the TikTok approach and best practices, but you get an influencer to create content on your behalf,and for your brand and you can reach their audience.

So what we have started to do is actually partner with these influencers in these specific sections and what people will often underestimate is the fact that there are TikTok influencers today who have experience in details, in everything from real estate, all the way through to software through spreadsheets.

We found one influencer for a client in the world of HVAC. Like there’s a wide range of different subjects that are being covered by these influencers. And if you can partner with them, you can unlock some amazing returns. 

Saksham Sharda: And how’d you go about finding the right influencer for your particular brand?

Is there a particular website where you search for influencers? How do any listeners of ours, if they want to find TikTok influencers who work for their industry, how do they find them?

Ross Simmonds : So today it’s a bit organic. You’re going to go to TikTok and use the hashtags that you believe would be relevant to your industry.

And then typically TikTok has an amazing algorithm that will automatically feed you with the individuals who are influential in that space. Now, when they feed you, those people they’re viewing it as this is content that you, as a user would find valuable. Feeding it to you in the context of this is someone who you should sponsor with and partner with.

That’s okay, because what you now have the ability to do on your end is reverse engineer. Why are they successful? How can I engage with them? Can I connect with them? Let’s send them a message. Let’s comment on their posts and ask them, Hey, can we jump on a call? And then you can take it from there.

And what’s also very interesting is right now, a lot of these influencers are still so early on in their career that they have never had someone reach out to them for a business opportunity before. So you’re typically one of the first to reach out to them, especially in a small niche and they’re flattered and they’re intrigued and they’re hungry and they’re ambitious and they want to see you win because this is their opportunity to eventually someday maybe become the next Kylie Jenner of their industry.

So there’s a ton of opportunities there. 

Saksham Sharda: Okay. Speaking of which, can you briefly explain to our listeners your ideas of cream content rules, everything around me and transitioning to dream and distribution rules, everything around me and how marketers can better distribute their content. Could you talk about that a little?

Ross Simmonds : I can. So a lot of marketing gurus for the last few decades have really preached about this idea that content is king, create more content. If you write more content, publish more content, the world will be yours and for good reason, right? Like there’s an increased level of demand for content. We talked about that earlier.

More people want content than ever before. And content is an important thing.  But with all of that, you have to recognize that it’s never been easier to create content. Everyone has a mobile phone, who’s sharing content, whether that’s a tweet, attacks, a status update, a video, more content is being created than ever before across the board, which means it’s more competitive than ever before.

So what do we, as marketers, need to do? Yes, we have to fundamentally create content, but that’s just doing what we’re supposed to do. You next have to think about how to spread that content. Because, yes, it is great that you’re creating these great assets, but if those great assets that you’re creating don’t reach the individuals that you’re trying to connect with, it’s for nothing.

We need to shift our mindset from always being about output in terms of the amount of content we’re creating and start thinking about how we can fully utilize those assets that we create. And spread them across a wide range of different channels. How can we take that one blog post and spread it into a subreddit, into a Twitter thread, into a podcast, turn it into a YouTube video. How can we turn that also into an update on medium and potentially even the video that lives on TikTok. For some reason, marketers think that their job is done when they press publish. But what we need to do is recognize that distribution is the ultimate most important thing.

And when you press publish, that’s actually the beginning of your job. 

Saksham Sharda: And you mentioned, Reddit threads, how’s your Reddit marketing going in general? Like, what is your approach to that? Cause I guess it’s not so easy to spam Reddit, with things that Reddit doesn’t like!

Related Post

Ross Simmonds : For sure. So I’m a big fan of Reddit. Like I’m a Redditer before I’m a marketer on Reddit, but I would say I’ve cracked the code to understanding how to do marketing on Reddit really well without getting banned. Don’t get me wrong. The first time I went in, I did exactly, as you described, took a bunch of links from my website and I submitted them to a handful of subreddits and five minutes later, I was, and I was blocked by Felicia.

Get out of here. You are done on Reddit and that sucked! But instead of just quitting and saying, I can’t do it anymore, I studied the way to do marketing on Reddit. And I think very quickly, I was able to get to a point where today I can say with confidence that I can make the front page in my sleep and the way that you do it is you reverse engineer, the various communities that you want to connect with and you study them and you learn about them.

If I’m going into a subreddit for entrepreneurs, I’m going to go into that subreddit, I’m going to sort the content by top posts and what I’m going to try and figure out is content user fit. I want to figure out what type of content in this subreddit do people want the most. And that is going to be the content that over the last year shows up as the top posts.

Why? Because if they are the top posts, it means they’ve got the most upvotes, and when they got the most upvotes, it means that people wanted that type of content. I’m going to export all of that and turn it into a spreadsheet. And I’m going to start to analyze and see what content in this community actually generated the most up votes, what content in this community generated the most comments. And I’m going to use that to inform me around themes and topics that I should discuss. So in the sub Reddit entrepreneur, if I find that the vast majority of the content that rose to the top is related to e-commerce. What do you think I’m going to create in terms of the content I deliver to this community? It’s going to be content about e-commerce.

I’m also going to look for trends to see what the format that they want. Is the vast majority of it YouTube videos? Is it just long form written texts? What type of format of content do they want? If it demonstrates from the research that the type of content that they want is actually long form content, I’m going to write a long form post, go into that entrepreneur subreddit, write a long form post about e-commerce. And throughout that post, I’m going to make references to pieces of content that I already created. So as someone who’s reading it, they’re getting a ton of value. I know what’s going to resonate with the audience because I’ve done the research to know this is something they want, but I’m also going to get business goals and objectives accomplished by linking to my own content.

So some people will start to go into my funnel. So that is the approach that I would apply to every single subreddit. If I’m in the world of barbecue, I’m going to study the subreddit on barbecue and do the same thing. If I’m in the world of serving new moms, I’m going to go to a subreddit dedicated to new moms and parenting.

I’m going to reverse engineer all of that. And then I’m going to take that same methodology. And maybe now I have to create a long form piece of content that is all about night training or something of that nature. But that’s the type of insight I’m looking for. And then that’s the type of content I would give my users and my audience in these communities.

So, I have a ton of content out there on this topic. I wrote in-depth blog posts and resources on Reddit marketing folks. Feel free to look it up and find it, or hit me up on Twitter. I’d be happy to share it as well and get that over to you. But yes, Reddit is a channel that I love and I think is truly underrated, but also a channel that marketers are afraid of.

But it’s one that we shouldn’t be afraid of as long as we route our efforts in. 

Saksham Sharda: Hmm. And, if you are planning a certain content piece or, you know, something that you’re going to produce, do you start with Reddit? What do you start with? Because the way you describe Reddit, it seems that it is a good place to find out what to produce as well.

Even if you’re not going to put it on Reddit, it seems to me that you can just find out what you should be writing. And so is that the place where you start or do you start on TikTok? Where do you find out what to write about? 

Ross Simmonds : Yeah. It starts in any community where your audience is spending time. It could be a subreddit, a slack community, Facebook group,  even be the Google search and zoom like results page. So like when you look at the SERP and you’re analyzing what content shows up, all of those things can give you an insight into what type of content you should create. The way that I approach all content creation is essentially starting with what is the overarching goal that we want to accomplish.

If the goal that we’re looking to accomplish is brand awareness and generating some buzz and traction across our community, in our industry, then I’m going to reverse engineer channels where that can happen such as TikTok. But if I’m looking to unlock something like backlinks for SEO purposes, then I’m going to do an analysis of my industry and see what content in my niche and in my space generated the most backlinks. And then I’m going to use that to inform the starting point for what type of content I should be creating as well. Similarly, if I’m looking at generating referral traffic from Reddit, the approach that we just discussed is going to be the one that I take.

Likewise, if Twitter is the channel, I’m going to analyze data surrounding what are the most popular topics in my niche on the, in various Twitter threads like those types of things.This entire concept is what I call the Sherlock holmeboy approach, which is essentially you take insight around, okay, this is what I want to accomplish.

A bunch of people have already accomplished certain elements of this, whether it was organic, whether it was intentional or not, I’m going to put on my Sherlock homeboy approach and try to reverse engineer how they got success. I’m going to study it,  look for trends and I’m going to analyze it.

And then I’m going to make a recommendation based on it. So similarly with podcasting, similarly with YouTube videos, it all comes down to researching based on where your audience is and the kind of content that they write. 

Saksham Sharda: So it’s surprising that you don’t call your company elementary marketing, you call it foundation marketing.

So what’s the aim behind his top listing Foundation Market? Tell us more about your company now. Getting from Sherlock to elementary marketing to foundation marketing! 

Ross Simmonds : So the name Foundation came from the simple belief that the foundation of storytelling comes from content.

And when you look at the interactions that we have on a regular basis, it’s typically just content like… people listening to us have this dialogue right now at this moment or in their ears, very intimate, very real. That is an essential piece of content, right? They’re consuming content. And what we want to do at a Foundation is fundamentally change the way the content is used to shape culture, specifically in our audience being B2B software companies. So what we truly believe is that content is one of the most powerful things in the world. If you think about storytelling dating back to hieroglyphics, etc. like content and stories have connected humans to the past, into the future, the ancient texts, all of those things.

So we have that fundamental belief. Our goal is to be a leader. And B2B marketing, with our clients in influencing their content culture internally and externally. What does that mean? So my mum’s still trying to figure it out, but I’ll explain it to your listeners. I think they’ll be able to get there very quickly. 

Essentially we shape the cultures internally through content, helping organizations have a content engine where their team is able to operationalize content marketing strategies and techniques consistently and at scale. So we go in, we understand their content culture. We understand the team dynamics. We understand the way that they are producing content, the way that they’re distributing content, we provide training and we provide recommendations on how they can improve it.

All of those different things. In a similar vein we also work with these companies to actually create content. So we’re producing and developing everything from blog posts to white papers, to Reddit strategies and creating the content that goes into these communities all the way through to distribution, where we’re actually acting on their behalf, spreading that content through social media channels, sponsoring newsletters, sponsoring podcasts on their behalf, distributing those stories on their behalf, but also assisting them with ensuring them when they press publish on a piece of content their content gets distributed through paid media channels as well. 

So we’re a full fledged content marketing agency. But we’re a little bit more diverse than that because we also sell information products. We have books, we have courses, we have a handful of resources and a lot more to come. So in the next few months, folks can keep an eye on our website and our foundation labs and our various brands as we start to produce and publish some research and some other cool projects that we have on our sleeves as well.

Saksham Sharda: Could you tell us about one interesting or challenging client, someone you had fun working with or some interesting campaign that you did? 

Ross Simmonds : Yeah. So one of the different things about Foundation is we don’t talk about our clients explicitly on our website anywhere as you will see. But what I can tell you is a high level insight around that niche that we were working in.

I won’t say exactly the client. So a challenge was, we work with B2B brands. So for most people, B2B is boring. It’s not fun. We’re not selling sneakers. We’re not doing cool NFT drops. Like there’s none of that stuff yet with B2B. 

So, one of our clients sells Dirt!  And that was their business, selling dirt. So for a lot of people, you would look at that and you’d be like, how in the world are you going to sell dirt?

And we had that challenge. We had that obstacle where we had to come up with unique ways to tell stories about dirt. So how do we approach it? We started to think about dirt uniquely. And we started to think about how dirt and sand and other natural resources are actually sold in the roles that they play.

It’s something that we found very interesting. And again, some people will listen to this and be like, this is so boring. But what we found interesting is that there’s different grades of sand that goes in like a golf course versus play sand that might be in your sandbox for your kid.

So we started to create content around the different types of sand that are being used at the various PGA courses all around the globe, things of that nature. So those types of things are elements that are challenging because they’re very boring in true traditional and niche. And we have to find a way to make content and tell stories that are actually going to stand out amongst the noise. When it’s typically very technical, we’ll put you to sleep.

Saksham Sharda: No for sure. This reminded me of two things. The first is that if there’s a market for it, it’s sellable and there’s a famous phrase – He’s so persuasive, he could sell sand to the Arabs! 

I don’t remember where it comes from, an idiom! Is still posed as if he could sell sand to the Arabs or snow to the Igloos, it was, I don’t know who, but for sure, I think as the more one gets into a particular niche and that’s the beauty of marketing is that you apply fundamental concepts to every industry and you will find that people will get interested.

So I’m just thinking an infographic about the different kinds of sands used in different kinds of golf courses or like give different things would be something interesting that I would want to read on the internet. So for sure. 

Ross Simmonds : Yeah, yeah, yeah, exactly. It’s fun. It’s definitely, yeah. And we face those types of challenges every day.

We work with brands who do again, the boring stuff, and while it’s boring to most, we get excited every single day to collaborate and work on that type of project because they force you to get more creative. Like it’s easy to launch the new Yeezy sneaker, right? I believe anyway, you get them to talk.

It’s relatively straightforward, but selling dirt. That’s a whole new challenge.

Saksham Sharda: Wow! Okay! So how did your journey begin in the field of content anyway? Like what led you here or did you always stay content? 

Ross Simmonds : Yeah, my journey was a lot more fun in their early days. So I started creating content about fantasy sports.

So my first love and like the light bulbs went off for me when I was in university creating content about fantasy sports in my parents’ basement and people all over the globe started to read what I had to say as a 19-20 year old kid. Writing about sports. And when I started to see thousands of people reading my content, communicating on my content, I was like, this internet thing is going to last.

And that’s when the light bulbs went off. If I can create content but sports and reach anyone, I can probably do that for any subject, any niche. You fast forward a little bit and my marks in university started to drop and my mum said, Hey, I know you’re doing well with this fantasy blog, but I need you to start writing about what you’re learning at school.

So I quickly shifted my blog to start writing about marketing. And when I started to write about marketing, I started to get opportunities. People started to reach out and that kind of took on its own new life for my career path, where every time I would press publish on a piece of content, new opportunities would show up.

They wanted to speak with me and connect with me. And as someone who went into the industry with no connections, like I couldn’t reach out to my uncle and say, Hey, give me an internship. I had no contacts in the world of marketing, let alone tech. I needed to kind of start my craft and use my craft to kind of open up new doors and opportunities.

Again, I live in a very small province in Canada on the east coast, Nova Scotia. Not a lot of people even know that. But I was able to, in the early days, reach people outside of that province and that opened up the world of opportunity. So for me, it all started with understanding, okay, if I can create content about fantasy sports and it can reach thousands of people and they’re interested, and then I can apply that same methodology to marketing and actually build a career off of it, then there’s something special here.

And that was essentially when the light bulbs went off and I’ve been at it ever since.

Saksham Sharda: That’s beautiful. And I think it’s the ability of the internet to connect so many. Like if you’re living in that far-flung part of the world, and yet you’re able to like, market for so many things in so many different places while there’s, it’s amazing. For sure!

And where do you think your future is leading you? 

Ross Simmonds : Yeah, I think the future for me is to continue down the path of pushing the content culture forward. Like I think for me, it’s all about creating content that inspires other people to chase their dreams. But also achieve their goals, whatever that may be.

So even though my lane is focused in the world of B2B and SEO and marketing, etc. The most powerful thing for me is when I get a message from someone who’s working in an entirely different industry, based on solving entirely different problems there, like, Hey, I studied that piece that you put out there about this topic and I’ve been able to achieve X, Y, and Z because of it.

That, to me, means the world because it shows that the work that we’re doing, doesn’t just impact the sole clients that we’re serving. But it has a ripple effect when we can be public about our wins. Public about our failures or successes, all of those things that there’s something magical happening, where other people are being influenced in a positive way to do things that are ultimately allowing them to get closer to achieving their goals and their objectives.

So when I look at it, fast forward and like what I see for my life. And as a marketer, it’s very straightforward. Like I want Foundation to be a great place for marketers to do great work. I want to be a leader in the B2B space by accomplishing that. But when I fast forward to the day in which I take my last few breaths, I want to know that I was able to kind of leave the world, impacting some people, to create great content and have a great life at the same time as all of that.

So that’s really what I envision for the future. 

Saksham Sharda: Hmm. And what do you think of like, in addition to impacting, uh, you know, similar content is being produced repeatedly and, you know, simply being repackaged and refashioned by everyone. How do you ensure originality, how do we ensure originality as marketers?

Cause you know, impact is one thing, but also like copycats out there. So how do you ensure originality?

Ross Simmonds : Yeah. So I think from, for it comes down to two things, you have to be authentically true to yourself and own that a hundred percent. So you’ll go on my accounts and you’ll see me talking about being a dad. That’s something that I’m passionate about. I love being a dad and  talk about it regularly. Also, I talk about the fresh prince because I like fresh prince. Even I talk about hip hop because I like hip hop. I will not water down like who I am, just because of like the way that the industry wants you to be. So I would encourage anyone listening to this to like really be themselves and stay true to that across the board. That’s the starting point.

And when people do start to copy you, it’s okay. I’ve had so much of my work copied and stole it. And even people using the dream acronym, like everything in the books you can think of, I’ve seen happen to my work.

People have taken my presentations, they’ve put their logo on it. It has happened consistently over the course of my career. And I’ve realized that, that’s a signal that you’re going in the right direction. So accept it, realize it, it’s okay. It’s going to happen. At a certain point yes, it can go too far and that’s when you get a legal team involved. But for the most part, just accept it as a part of the game, like accept it as a part of the game, people are going to copy your work and it demonstrates that you’re moving in the right direction. So, that’s been my angle and my approach. I’m going to continue down a path where it’s like, let me do what I believe is true to myself and try to give that to people unfiltered.

At the same time,  that originality on its own is something that I think everyone should recognize has value because. Two people can resonate with completely two different people who are saying the exact same thing. So if individual A and individual B say the exact same thing, but the person listening to it resonates more with the story and the background and the history and the experience that somebody else had, they’re going to gravitate towards that person.

So yes, there will be similar stories told. Every story is coming from someone with an entirely different background and story and message that got them to get them to that point. Even if they are twin sisters, brothers, etc. that lived in the same life, same household, they’re going to have completely different experiences in terms of the way that they saw the world.

So I think there is something powerful around that reality. 

Saksham Sharda: And I suppose it does no such thing as a truly original story. I guess everything just is borrowed from something which has just mutated a little.

Ross Simmonds : So, yeah. Well, when you look at Avatar, you look at Pocahontas, even all of these stories, they’re all very closely aligned.

Like you look at Hamlet and you look at the Lion King, they’re the exact same story. They’re the exact same story, except in Hamlet, there weren’t lions and stuff like that. All those messaging is the exact same. But we all think like you have these amazing hypotheses and the jury is completely unique. But that’s not the case. And now more than ever, because we are such a global society, stories are being spread so great. 

Saksham Sharda: And it’s also become evident how much of art is also marketing just as how much of marketing is also art? So, I feel like when we are producing content, it is kind of a lot like art, even though it’s not given the same status as such. Whereas when people are producing art, they have to do a lot of marketing for that art to get somewhere.

So those boundaries are getting intimate. So tell me, what would you be doing? This is the last question. 

What would you be doing now? If not this in your life?

Ross Simmonds : I think if I was not doing this, I would be focused on the education system, I would probably be working in education in some way.

I think there’s a lot of issues with the way in which students are taught that you have to do a certain thing and go down a certain path to be successful. I think the way that we teach people, marketing communications is broken in many ways. So I would probably be focusing on that.

Goodbye!

Saksham Sharda: Okay, well, that was the last question.

And thanks everyone for joining us for this month’s episode of Outgrows’ Marketer of the Month. That was Ross Simmonds , who is the founder and CEO at Foundation Marketing. 

Thanks for joining us Ross.

Ross Simmonds : Thanks for having me. I appreciate it. 

Saksham Sharda: Check out the website for more details and we’ll see you once again next month with another Marketer of the Month.

 

 

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